DID YOU KNOW? To cause the wrecking of ships the locals of the Coast of Death used to hung lit lanterns from the horns of their oxen
DID YOU KNOW? To cause the wrecking of ships the locals of the Coast of Death used to hung lit lanterns from the horns of their oxen

The oldest legend that is known about the place name Coast of Death has it that in nights of rainstorm and low visibility, some locals of the coast walked their oxen around the limits of the the capes and headlands. Lit lanterns hung from the horns of these animals and, with the rocking caused by their walking, they resembled other boats. In this way, to procure a good shelter from the storm and by imitation of these supposed boats, the ships approached the coast, falling into a mortal trap when they inevitably run aground. It was then that…

DID YOU KNOW? The Lires estuary is the smallest in Galicia and it has an extraordinary ornithological richness
DID YOU KNOW? The Lires estuary is the smallest in Galicia and it has an extraordinary ornithological richness

Common Sandpiper (photo by Javier Figueiras) The Lires estuary is formed by the mouth of the Castro river, forming the natural boundary between the municipality of Cee and the municipality of Muxía. It is the smallest estuary in Galicia, with a huge natural landscape and ornithological charm. Its strategic geographical location, at the western end of the European continent, makes it an obligatory crossing point for many seabirds, and this, together with the fact that it is also a secondary route for a significant number of la…

DID YOU KNOW? Barnacles are hermaphrodites
DID YOU KNOW? Barnacles are hermaphrodites

Barnacles have both male and female reproductive organs. However, barnacles can not self-fertilize. To carry out reproduction, it is necessary for another specimen to intervene so that one of them acts as a male and the other as a female. Each individual assumes a certain role in mating, but we do not know for sure what this choice depends on. The pairing of barnacles takes place from spring to the beginning of autumn. As they cannot move because they are attached to rocks, fertilization can take place in two different ways. In the …

DID YOU KNOW? In the Coast of Death there is also black gold
DID YOU KNOW? In the Coast of Death there is also black gold

Percebeiro- Photo courtesy of Juanma Abelleira Ronquete The percebe or goose barnacle (Pollicipes pollicipes) is a cirripede crustacean that, given its great gastronomic value, is known as the black gold of the Coast of Death, reaching very high prices in our markets. Since the best barnacles are found on rocks heavily beaten by the waves, the job of the "percebeiro" can be extremely risky and it claims, on average, the lives of five fishermen every year. This danger together with their scarcity contribute, therefore, to t…

DID YOU KNOW? The sea used to reach the old church of Lires
DID YOU KNOW? The sea used to reach the old church of Lires

The current Church of Santo Estevo* de Lires was built in the eighteenth century to replace the old one, which was closer to the estuary and frequently ran the risk of flooding during the spring tides. The visitor of the archbishopric of Santiago, Don Jerónimo del Hoyo, wrote about the old church of Lires, which still remains in popular memory, and said: "San Esteban* de Lires, annexe of Santa María de la Junquera of Cee. This congregation has forty parishioners. There is no Blessed Sacrament because the sea ca…

DID YOU KNOW? The name Coast of Death comes from the numerous shipwrecks that took place here
DID YOU KNOW? The name Coast of Death comes from the numerous shipwrecks that took place here

Photo courtesy of Modesto Canosa The Coast of Death, the Galician coastline stretching from Malpica to Fisterra, earned this name by the numerous shipwrecks that took place in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and which were made popular through Galician and English literature. Although this stretch of coastline is part of the old naval chronicle, the place-name Coast of Death is quite modern, dating back just a century. The first appearances of the term in Spanish and Galician always refer to shipwrecks that occurred in th…

DID YOU KNOW? The total number of ships counted that sank in the Coast of Death amounts to almost one thousand
DID YOU KNOW? The total number of ships counted that sank in the Coast of Death amounts to almost one thousand

  The Coast of Death houses the marine cemetery with the most shipwrecks catalogued in Spain. Ships of all types lie at the bottom of these coasts: brigantines, galleons, sailboats, fishing boats, merchants, submarines, frigates, and ... even crude oil tankers. Practically all the cultures or civilizations that crossed the seas left remains in the Coast of Death, enriched in this way with an underwater archeology of incalculable value. The writer Hixinio Puentes, who works in the historical field, assures that "only the rema…

DID YOU KNOW? An English writer helped baptize this land Costa da Morte
DID YOU KNOW? An English writer helped baptize this land Costa da Morte

Some bibliographies point out that the name of the region is not Galician, that it was coined by the writer Annette Meakin, a  friend of Queen Victoria´s, wife of King Alfonso XIII. Back in 1908, surprised and horrified by the shipwrecks that occurred at the end of the 19th century, the writer ended up referring to this coast as "Coast of Death". Meakin clarified that the name was popular among English sailors owing to the number of shipwrecks on this coast. Subsequently, under the influence of the press from Britain …

This website uses cookies to improve user experience. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. OK More information